Special Issue: Indigenous Peoples and the Politics of Water

This is very alarming, and how long has it been going on??? Also from USA Today.. “Young children in in several New Jersey cities have higher levels of lead in their blood than children in Flint, Mich., where a water contamination crisis has grabbed national attention.

There were more than 3,000 new cases in New Jersey of children under 6 with elevated lead levels in 2015, bringing the total to around 225,000 since 2000, said Elyse Pivnick, director of environmental health for Isles Inc. New Jersey’s exposure is linked to lead paint in homes, not water supplies.”

“Because of Flint, Michigan, most of the world now knows lead in water can poison children,” said Pivnick. “The deplorable water scandal is an important story, but it is just as tragic and alarming that thousands of children in New Jersey continue to be exposed to lead year after year.”

The New Jersey cities affected by lead were Irvington, Trenton, Newark, Paterson, Plainfield, Jersey City, Elizabeth, Atlantic City, New Brunswick and Passaic, plus Cumberland and Salem counties. Notice the cities listed are all the NJ ghettos, which are filled with expendable blacks and latinos.

Decolonization

Download a shareable PDF of this Call for Submissions here:

The Politics of Water- Special Issue – Decolonization


Title: Indigenous Peoples and The Politics of Water

Editors: Melanie K. Yazzie (University of New Mexico) and Dr. Cutcha Risling Baldy (San Diego State University)

Abstracts Due: April 4, 2016

Submissions Due: August 31, 2016

                                               

Call for Submissions

Overview

[Feb 3, 2016] Decolonization: Indigeneity, Education & Society invites articles from scholars, artists, activists, policy makers, and community members for a special issue of the journal exploring Indigenous peoples and the politics of water. Water is an ancient and sacred element of Indigenous epistemologies and ways of life. Water sustains, builds and inspires. In the contemporary context climate change, water security, and environmental destruction have captivated popular attention. A proliferation of scholarly and public works, as well as (inter)governmental working groups and summits, have emerged to address these interrelated issues. We acknowledge…

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